Nemesister – review and interview with Sophie Jonas-Hill

I am pleased to welcome to Air and Sea Stories, Sophie Jonas-Hill, whose pacy psychological thriller Nemesister was recently published by Urbane Publications. First off, a review of the book, followed by an interview with Sophie: Review – Nemesister Sophie Jonas-Hill’s novel is an incredibly atmospheric thriller that swings from eerie to brooding to intense…

“Vintener is Coming” – Fields of Glory review

When historical novelist Jemahl Evans recommended Michael Jecks’ Fields of Glory, the first in his Hundred Years War series, I knew there was a good chance I was in for a decent read. Moreover, having just launched a mediaeval novel myself (An Argument of Blood, co-written with J.A. Ironside, about the lead up to 1066),…

Author S.K. Keogh – relentless pursuit, betrayal, and revenge

Air and Sea Stories is pleased to welcome S.K. Keogh, author of a series of swashbuckling but nuanced nautical adventures. I’m delighted to interview Susan on the relaunch of the first in the series, The Prodigal. Here’s how Susan describes her Jack Mallory books: A story of relentless pursuit, betrayal, and revenge: As a young…

Two new William the Conqueror novels

Today is the 950th anniversary of the Battle of Hastings – the single battle that has perhaps done more to shape the destiny of England than any other. The fate of England, and indeed, Europe, looked very different in the evening of 14 October 1066 than it had early that morning. This seems a good…

Difficult second novel – the quest continues

I don’t usually go in for the ‘writing process’ stuff on this website – it’s done so well by so many other writers that there doesn’t seem to be much point. But I’ve heard the same thing from a number of novelists recently, ranging from the huge-selling HarperCollins published superstar to the dewy eyed newbie,…

My Writing Process – blog hop

Thanks to Alaric Bond for inviting me to take part in this ‘blog hop’. Alaric’s ‘Fighting Sail’ novels are among my favourites in the genre, so I am delighted Alaric thought of me – it’s a tough act to follow, of course. See Alaric’s blog here 1) What am I working on? Typically for me,…

Daisy White’s Booktique – a godsend for indie authors

Over the last few months I’ve had the opportunity to bring my novel Daedalus and the Deep to a wider audience. These days, with only one large bookshop chain existing in the South of England, and ever more pressure to make money, opportunities for indie-published authors to get their books into bookshops don’t abound. Enter,…

Two reviews of Daedalus and the Deep

Two reviews of Daedalus and the Deep have now been published. The Founding Fields, a site dedicated to SF and fantasy fiction published its review in January 2014 and concludes that the novel ‘masterfully merges historical accuracy with exciting fantasy’. ‘For those already wondering from that brief description, no it’s not a Moby Dick story……

Seymour Hamilton interviews Matthew Willis

Seymour Hamilton, author of the ‘Astreya’ series of nautical fantasy novels, interviews Matthew Willis about Daedalus and the Deep, writing in general, and naval history. Access the interview on the Sound Cloud here

Daedalus and the Deep – the real sea serpent mystery

Daedalus and the Deep has its roots in real events. HMS Daedalus was a real ship, a Leda-class frigate built in 1820 and later re-rated to corvette. HMS Daedalus was best known in Victorian Britain, for the sighting of a sea-serpent between the Cape of Good Hope and St Helena in 1848 – 165 years…

Daedalus and the Deep pictorial Guide 1 – Sailing

Frigates and corvettes – HMS Daedalus was originally a frigate, and under sail in the 1840s would have looked very much like HMS Raleigh as pictured here. A frigate has a single gun deck (shown here by the single row of gunports along the white band running the length of the hull). In 1844 she…

Daedalus and the Deep pictorial Guide 2 – Fighting

Weaponry of one form or another is quite important in Daedalus and the Deep, as with much historic naval fiction. HMS Daedalus had a broadside battery of twenty heavy 32-pounder cannon, as well as carronades (a short-range, lightweight cannon) and smaller weapons. The following images of the gundecks on HMS Warrior (5), built 1860 and…